Tag Archives: Camp Knife

Weekly Update 4.9.16 ~ Camp Knives Review

The weekly update is a little late once again but a few more GEC Camp Knives arrived and I thought I’d bring you up to date with a quick review.  I really like this knife and while I don’t see myself carrying or using one, it’s definitely built to be a workhorse.

98 Camp Knife
98 Camp Knife Kingwood Handle

The Kingwood handle material is really stunning.  Some of the nicest grained Kingwood you could ask for.  I’ve gotten really fond of wood handles and this is a gem.

It fills the average sized hand and should feel comfortable for anyone with the largest hands.  I wouldn’t be afraid to take on cleaning most big game as the blade is stout and the handle provides a more then adequate area to grip.

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I’m unable to explain the coloration on the concave surface of the Awl.  It almost appears to have been cold blued and the coloration is more uniform on some then others.  I sent an email to GEC this afternoon and hope to get an answer next week.  I’m assuming it’s intentional albeit a bit distracting.  The steel isn’t ‘burned’ as the opposite side has been nicely polished.

98 Camp Knife Awl Coloration
98 Camp Knife Awl Coloration

I really like this knife and I sincerely wish the run would have been bigger so I hope no one gets a knot in their shorts when I point out a couple other observations.  NONE of these are issues that bother me in the least, but based on experience, I’m sure a few cutlery connoisseurs may take issue.  If minor details bother you…caveat emptor.  These aren’t design flaws, signs of poor workmanship or anything other then just being the nature of the beast.

IF you have a problem with the back of the blade not being flush with the springs be advised.  The blade tends to sit about .050″ below the spring and that’s pretty consistent with the secondary blades as well.  This isn’t anything I find to be of a concern but recently had a GEC returned for a step small enough it couldn’t even be accurately measured.

Blade sets below the spring
Blade sets below the spring

Second thing is the point of the blade can definitely be felt rubbing a finger tip over the end of the knife.  This isn’t a design flaw either in my estimation but rather unavoidable with so much steel between the liners.

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The blade sets low between the liners but it doesn’t take much downward pressure to make contact.DSC_2152

Another minor issue is the bails are attached tight enough to rub the bolsters and mark them.  They’re coming out of the tube like this so don’t be surprised.  If it bothers anyone, it’s incredibly easy to buff out the marks with a little green polishing compound on a cotton rag but they’re gonna come back.

Bail rubs bolster
Bail rubs bolster

I’ve found a few of the knives don’t have real sharp edges but it’s pretty unusual for me to find a factory traditional folder with what I consider a field ready edge.  And the edge on the awl could be cleaned up a bit for a nice smooth cut.  It definitely cuts leather but leaves things a bit shaggy.  I don’t think it really matters as I don’t see too many folks using it as it was intended anyway.

The Camp Knives rank up there close to the Lumberjack and a few other ‘oddities’ we used to see on a semi regular basis.  And I like it.  I only point out the above ‘issues’ as I don’t want anyone tripping over themselves to buy one without knowing this isn’t your average ‘pocket knife’.  This is a large working tool made for anyone that wants a heavy duty knife meant for heavy duty use.