Edge Pro Stones, Trestle Pine Gunflint, 154 Steel

A key point in making the Trestle Pine Knives has been the use of premium blade steels.  Every now and then I hear from a customer regarding the steel and it’s always gratifying to hear it’s as good as I hoped.   This week I got an email from a customer with a Superior and he expressed how well the steel performed.  At the show last weekend, two customers dropped by the tables to give their feedback.

One of the guys at the show brought up the point that while the 154 series will hold an edge like crazy, there’s a price to be paid when sharpening it, although its worth it.  That price involves a bit more time sharpening if you neglect the edge.

Personally, I use the Edge Pro sharpener and admit to staying on top of things.  Every couple of weeks I’ll take a few swipes over the edge to keep things shaving sharp.   It only takes a few minutes and the payoff is worth it.  Yesterday I took touched my Gunflint up and checked the condition of the stones I’m using.

This is a look at the thickness of the mounted stone and the cupping in the middle of the stone is pretty obvious.  I can’t really quantify it, but this stone is about a year old and has sharpened, many, many knives, including 1095, D2, S30V and 154.  I’ve dressed it once before but the wear is more noticeable since I’ve primarily been using it on the harder steels.  Time to dress the stone.

Old stone (top) New Stone (bottom)

I’ve found one of the simplest methods to dress a stone is using wet and dry sandpaper.  In this case, I’m using a 220 grit wet and dry.

600 Grit mounted stone on 220 grit wet and dry

After just a few circular strokes on the sandpaper, you can start to see the effect on the ends of the stone as they’re smoothed down.

A couple more minutes and  it’s really apparent that its having the desired effect.

And after less then 5 minutes the surface is dressed to level.  The stone is thinner then a new one, but I’ve just stretched the life of that stone by several months and many sharpening sessions.

In the past I’ve also used the 2000 grit diamond tape to finish the edge to a mirror polish resulting in an incredible sharp edge.  Edge Pro has a 4000 grit stone that I just started using and it puts a fantastic finished edge on things.  The texture of the 4000 stone is so smooth you question whether it’ll actually do anything or not.  Trust me, it does.

The true test is in how thin a sliver of paper I can shave and the effort to cut through the paper requires the slightest pressure.  Add to that the fact I have an edge that will hold up extremely well and I’ve got a winning combination.

I’m just starting to get feedback on the Gunflint and the comments have been positive.  One criticism (?) I have heard from a couple of people is I failed to have the blade steel stamped on the tang of the Gunflint.  I’ll admit it was an oversight on my part and wish I’d had it marked.   The tube label is marked and the COA’s are marked, but the tang…..

Somebody asked me which of the Trestle Pine series do I personally like the most.  That’s a tough question.  I tend to rotate my way through them and every time I do, I think I’ve found my favorite.  Until I switch models.

I’ve got a few weeks of pocket time on mine and really like the Gunflint.  The screwdriver I still miss but I can always go back to the Topper when I need it.  The shape of the handle fits my hand well and seems to work with the Wharncliff blade.

 

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