Weekly Update 9.15.17 Trestle Pine Gunflint Notes

Busy week this week with a number of new knives from Queen and a couple more GEC Calf Pens.  I also added a few more Trestle Pine Toppers to fill some inventory holes.

Since I posted the pictures of some samples of wood that will be available on the Trestle Pine Gunflint, I’ve been asked if those will be the only handle options available.  In short, no.  There will also be the Old Growth Ash, Oak, Maple and Yellow Birch.  Plus, there are several more premium woods like a premium Curly Koa and Old Growth Redwood.  And no doubt a few other choices as well will turn up as well.

Curly Koa & Old Growth Redwood

Interest in the Blue Dyed Curly Maple has been high.  On the last run of Trestle Pine’s the Blue Curly Maple sold out immediately.  Sven at the Messer Depot in Germany was lamenting the fact he didn’t order more.  This time, there will be more Blue available on the Gunflint and this lot of Curly Maple is outstanding.

Dyed Curly Maple

On this run of the Gunflint I’m having to saw all of the wood panels.  In the past, at least half of them came to me pre-sawed which saved a bunch of time.  I was working with a 9″ band saw and it seemed like I was constantly fighting it to keep a consistent thickness.  I found a good buy on a 14″ and oh what a difference it makes.  When you’re trying to make consistent cuts through stabilized 1″ stock that are .20″ thick the slightest flex in the blade raises hell with the finished slab.  The new saw is going to pay for itself real fast by dramatically reducing material loss.  It just doesn’t pay to go the less expensive route.

I hope that by late next week I’ll have some of the ‘new’ wood in stock to saw, sand and buff.  I’m really anxious to see what the finished panels will look like.

A couple of weeks ago I had a brief post about sharpening and mentioned our friend Dave using a slight micro bevel when he finished up.  The idea being that a few final strokes at an increased angle will result in a micro bevel that would actually add some strength to the the edge, however minor.  I tried it and I think Dave may have something.  If nothing else, I think it’s effectively making sure that ‘wire’ is removed in its entirety.    It’s been about two weeks since I last touched up my blade and it’s still in great shape.

Next weekend I’m heading out to North Dakota for one more go at the Prairie Dogs.  For you other ‘shootists’ out there, I bought a Savage Predator in 6.5 Creedmoor and can’t wait to try it out.  I’ve worked up some 107 gr reloads that should be able to buck that North Dakota ‘breeze’ a little better and make more of those 400+ yd shots possible.  Should be interesting!!!

 

4 thoughts on “Weekly Update 9.15.17 Trestle Pine Gunflint Notes

  1. I think perhaps the best benefit of applying the micro bevel to finish up an already sharp edge is that it produces a “clean” edge, removing any possible remaining wire edge “burr” that may not be apparent by feel or sight. It also helps to give the edge a bit of additional strength by the slightly higher angle of the final micro bevel, which helps to prevent rolling or chipping of the edge under normal use. Just be careful to create only an almost imperceptible micro bevel with one or two very light passes of a fine stone so as not to create a secondary bevel. We only want to clean up the already sharp edge to remove any possible remaining “burr” and give the edge just a hint more strength.
    I find my micro bevel edges last longer and do not require touch up as often.

    1. Do you mean the Printers Saw? Know of which you speak. I worked in a small print shop that published our local newspaper back in the early 60’s and they had a saw but not sure if it was a Millers or not. I was the expert on an ancient (at that time) small hand fed Heildelberg Press we printed lunch tickets on. Never mashed a finger but came close a time or two!!

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